Paris and the French Revolution (LS-EU-233)

Parisian scenes of the great revolutionary days: how did they look like? How do they look like now?

Digital exploration of Paris

Through the digital exploration of significant scenes and locations of the Revolutionary Days in Paris, during the French Revolution (years 1789-1794), the students will collaboratively produce a guided tour highlighting the traces of the past in the present urban elements.
In the course of this project, students will develop knowledge and skills in History (mastering and using chronological and spatial landmarks).
In an expanded version of this scenario, students will also develop media literacy (skills to access, critically evaluate and create media).


The historical zone in Paris. uMap.
The historical zone in Paris. uMap.

During this learning activity, the students will learn how to understand a founding historical sequence (the “Revolutionary Days”), where each event must be explained by its context (contextualisation). They will develop their ability to produce a historical narrative.

Through the collaborative production of a (possibly digital) guided tour of the significant events of the Revolutionary Days in Paris, students develop knowledge and skills in History (mastering and using chronological and spatial landmarks: see skills in the history curriculum of French education).

La Bastille et la porte Saint-Antoine. Jean Baptiste Lallemand [?]. Bibliothèque nationale de France. No Copyright.
La Bastille et la porte Saint-Antoine. Jean Baptiste Lallemand [?]. Bibliothèque nationale de France. No Copyright.

They will reflect on the difficulties of building a new political and social order.

They will also develop media literacy (“Media literacy encompasses the practices that allow people to access, critically evaluate, and create media”[1]).

Link to the digital tour.


A digital guide to the revolutionary days in Paris

An enhancement to this learning scenario can consist in asking each group to write a short interview with a character who was present at the historical event (see Annex for character proposals).

In this setting, students could record the interview, and the teacher could then integrate the audio files into the 360° interactive scenes to create a digital guide to the revolutionary days in Paris. In this case, the teacher will have to ask the students’ legal guardians for permission to publish works with audio recordings.

These audio sequences could have the journalistic form of a “Revolution” Radio, mixing the words of a reporter with those of historical actors.

This learning scenario was created by François Jourde, Europeana Ambassador for the European Schools, in collaboration with Jean-Christophe Jost, Europeana Ambassador for France.


[1] Wikipedia Contributors (2019). Media literacy. [online] Wikipedia. Available at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_literacy [Accessed 20 Nov. 2019].


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The featured image used to illustrate this article has been found on Europeana Collections and belongs to the public domain.

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