Implementation of ‘Lost Memorabilia’ (SOI-HR-92)

What do Maths, History and English have in common? If you are interested in the answer you should implement the “Lost Memorabilia“ Learning Scenario created by Ella Rakovac Bekeš. I implemented it with my History and Maths colleagues with 15+ aged students.

Topics

This learning scenario is about data, measurement, numbers, algebra and functions set in the context of the WWI. It goes through an interactive story so that students can develop all language skills. To be more specific, my students had to go through a fictional story based on true facts from WWI. On their way, they had to solve maths problems to get clues which led them to lost memorabilia.

Students going through a fictional story to find clues about lost memorabilia
Students going through a fictional story to find clues about lost memorabilia

Delivery of the lesson

This LS was carried out during four lessons. In the introduction, the students revised some facts from WWI and used an interactive timeline. After opening the Lost Memorabilia created in Genially, they solved maths tasks based on scenes and facts from the WWI. They worked in groups of 4-5, and three groups finished it on time, while one group got wrong results and needed to return to the previous task. Maths tasks were done under the supervision of the Maths teacher.

During the classes the students developed 4 Cs, they used their own devices (tablets), had a lot of fun while learning and were in the centre of the learning process.

Students solving maths problems in order to gather evidence
Students solving maths problems in order to gather evidence of lost memorabilia

Follow-up activity

As an addition to this learning scenario, my Maths colleague and I invented a follow-up story which was given to the students as homework. We told the girls to hop back in place and time and imagine they were girls during the first World War, waiting for their boyfriends. The girls should write a letter to the boys and suggest a secret meeting and the time and place should be written in the form of a maths task. The boys who were waiting for the letters had to choose one and respond to it by solving the tasks.

Feedback

As a form of assessment, all three teachers asked the students for feedback about the lesson. What did they learn? How did they contribute to the lesson? Did they like it? Their answers were positive. They were impressed by Lost Memorabilia and agreed that doing Maths with History and in English was fun.

Did you find this story of implementation interesting? Why don’t you read about the related learning scenario?

Lost Memorabilia by Ella Rakovac Bekeš

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CC BY-NC-SA 4.0: The featured image used to illustrate this article has been found on Europeana Collections and has been provided by the National Library of Scotland.

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